Shorelines Exhibit

Announcing my exhibit Shorelines at Arden Gallery, 129 Newbury Street, Boston, Massachusetts 02116  USA.

web Arden 2016-front

web Arden 2016-back

The exhibit will be on view June 2 – 28, 2016 with a reception Saturday, June 4 from 4-6pm. Included in the show will be views from Lubec, Maine, and Gloucester and Cape Cod, Massachusetts. Everyone is invited.

From Here to There

nc web TM8700 Between Here and There 36x40 oil on panel

TM8700 From Here to There 36×40 oil on panel

Simple can be best. I started this painting with thoughts of a complex sky over the stark, low tide, Lubec Channel on the coast of Maine. As I worked, the focus changed. I saw the interesting subtleties of the land, and decided to subdue the sky, while maintaining some of the original cloud forms and fog bank. The contrast of the truly dark mud and channel bottom with the bright white of the incoming fog sets up enough drama. At the same time, the drama is soothing – perhaps due to the quiet tones and strong horizontals interspersed with sliding angles. The dark band of channel bottom was a great place to experiment with the use of impasto medium and some knife work, along with using a silicone scraper to “dig” into the paint. Spatter layers set the gravelly foreground, especially after I added some broken brushstrokes. Details below. Enjoy.

nc web TM8700 Between Here and There  - detail from middle left showing Grand Manon across the low tide Lubec Channel with exposed granite outcrop, fog rolling in

TM8700 Between Here and There – detail from middle left showing Grand Manon across the low tide Lubec Channel

nc web TM8700 From Here to There - detail from foreground showing outcrop and exposed marine vegetation

TM8700 From Here to There – detail from foreground showing outcrop and exposed marine vegetation

Stream Currents

nc web TM9701 Stream Currents 40x36 oil on panel

TM8701 Stream Currents 40×36 oil on panel

I never know where a painting will take me. Stream Currents began its life last December, when the first films of solid ice were covering the part of the pond where a stream enters. I worked on it for a few months, but never felt there was enough interesting paint to match the subtle subject. I turned it to the wall and began other paintings. Last week, I found it again, and thought the winter explorations might be an interesting base for trying a stream I had  visited on an overcast, gray day. I rolled a messy bluish gray paint over some parts of the painting, and did some wiping and scraping. Finally something interesting began to happen. I let it dry and resumed work on it the following day, again using my rubber roller to move the paint around. Continued scraping and spattering livened the effect. Adding the floating leaves amidst the new grasses helped set the planes and time of year, when old and new growth are mingling. Details below. Enjoy.

nc web TM8701 Stream Currents - detail from right side with floating leaves, grasses - note use of scraping away glaze to suggest grass blades

TM8701 Stream Currents – detail from right side with floating leaves, grasses – note use of scraping away glaze to suggest grass blades

nc web TM8701 Stream Currents - detail from upper left quadrant with reflections and grasses

TM8701 Stream Currents – detail from upper left quadrant with reflections and grasses

nc web TM8701 Stream Currents - detail  from lower left quadrant showing current and floating leaves, also use of scraping into underlayer of paint  followed by transparent glaze and spatter

TM8701 Stream Currents – detail from lower left quadrant showing current and floating leaves, also use of scraping into wet underlayer of painting followed by use of transparent glazes and spatter

Lily Pond

nc web TM8699 Lily Pond 18x30 oil on panel

TM8699 Lily Pond 18 x 30 oil on panel

The feeling of transience when one looks into the water surrounding  a lily is one subject of Lily Pond. I began it last winter, then set it aside because it was hard to remember the mood of summer when the pond was decidedly iced over. With the return of lily pads this week, and days of rain, I resumed work on the painting. The toned down palette shows the effect of overcast days, while the actual lilies were influenced by my hopeful feelings for spring and the way it can unfold so gently. Details below. Enjoy.

nc web TM8699 Lily Pond - close up of center lily

TM8699 Lily Pond – close-up of center lily

nc web TM8699 Lily Pond - detail from upper right with lily and reflection

TM8699 Lily Pond – detail from upper right with lily and reflection

nc web TM8699 Lily Pond - close-up from left side

TM8699 Lily Pond – close-up from left side

 

 

The Fog Withdraws

nc web TM8697 The Fog Withdraws 36x54 oil on panel

TM8697 The Fog Withdraws 36×54 oil on panel

It’s a mysterious presence based on absence. A vague cloud that roams across the sea and engulfs whatever it meets, causes even the strongest land forms to blink out. I love watching the action – the way fog sends out fingers of white, rolls in banks of gray. The way the air feels dense and moist. The drips. The smells. Sometimes it wavers – as if it were trying to make up its mind – advance, retreat, or both. The Fog Withdraws is about that presence and moment, when the fog is indeterminate, wavering, before finally beginning its retreat. Enjoy. Details below.

nc web TM8697 The Fog Withdraws  - detail showing second headland enshrouded

TM8697 The Fog Withdraws – detail showing second headland enshrouded

nc web TM8697 THe Fog Withdraws - detail  from right side looking to far shoreline

TM8697 The Fog Withdraws – detail from right side looking to far shoreline

nc web TM8697 The Fog Withdraws - close-up from lower left showing low tide flats

TM8697 The Fog Withdraws – close-up from lower left showing low tide flats

 

 

Up at the Lake

TM8698 Up at the Lake 30x24 oil on panel

TM8698 Up at the Lake 30×24 oil on panel

Yes, I’ve been spending lots of imaginative time in Lubec recently, but there are other subjects. This week I finally finished a smaller landscape that has been in the works for quite some time. The painting, begun last fall, was progressing well. In fact, it was almost done when I ran into a design problem – how to integrate the water (and its strong horizontals) with the cliff (equally strong verticals). I mulled it over for a few months, and nearly sanded the panel clean. Working on the foggy Lubec paintings gave me the idea of incorporating morning fog as a compositional device to integrate the two parts of the painting. Besides, I just love foggy mornings with all their sense of mystery. I think it worked. Now, the sunlight cutting across the tops  of the trees as matched by the light of the fog rising. The ineffable quality of the fog also balances the tough strength of the granite. Enjoy.

TM8698 Up at the Lake - close-up, top of rise

TM8698 Up at the Lake – close-up, top of rise