Exhibit Preview in American Art Collector Magazine

I want to thank American Art Collector Magazine for publishing a preview article for my August show at Arden Gallery – Upstream, Downstream. They graciously sent me a pdf to share, so share I will! You can use the zoom feature on your computer screen to increase the size, if necessary. I’ve included a link to their facebook page below. Enjoy.

Malo Article, American Art Collector magazine, August 2015 issue

American Art Collector Magazine, August 2015 issue, Malo review article

 American Art Collector Magazine, August 2015 issue, preview article

American Art Collector Magazine, August 2015 issue, preview article

Courtesy, American Art Collector

https://www.facebook.com/AmericanArtCollector

 

Island Time at the Bristol Art Museum

TM8149 Song in a Key for Lucent Green 36x36 oil on panel

TM8149 Song in a Key for Lucent Green 36×36 oil on panel

Last night’s opening of the exhibition Island Time at the Bristol Art Museum in Bristol, Rhode Island was delightful. An enthusiastic crowd, tasty nibbles, and a beautiful setting all contributed to make it a special evening. I want to pass on a recommendation to anyone looking for a fun getaway – go to Bristol, eat out at one of the great restaurants, take a leisurely walk along the harbor and downtown, then visit the museum. Ahhhhh!

http://bristolartmuseum.org

At High Tide

TM8564 At High Tide 36x36 oil on panel

TM8564 At High Tide 36×36 oil on panel

Maybe it’s because I visited Bristol, Rhode Island last weekend and had a chance to smell that wonderful briny air and sit on a patio overlooking the bay, or maybe it’s because I’ve been dreaming of the Maine coat and seafood – but this is my pretend vacation painting. I want to walk this beach  At High Tide barefoot, feel this fog coming in, and eat clams on this shore. And I will enjoy it.

TM8564 At High Tide 36x36 oil on panel

TM8564 At High Tide 36×36 oil on panel

Technical painting notes: This close-up of the wave shows the “circles” of splashed paint under the wave. I used Liquin Impasto medium mixed with a light gray paint to create the rough gestures of the crashing water. When it was dry, I glazed the wave, then brought out highlights. I also added a touch of fine spatter “droplets” to suggest the water splashing. Additional glazing introduced some green tones in the wave, and raw sienna glazes suggested sand under the water in the foreground.

Shadows and Reflections

TM8563 Shadows and Reflections 36x36 oil on panel

TM8563 Shadows and Reflections 36×36 oil on panel

Shadows and Reflections looks down into the pond in spring, during the height of pollen season, when the pattern in the water of reflected leaves is blurred by the film of pollen and dust on the water’s surface. On bright days, a pattern of subtle cast shadows from nearby trees adds to the complexity. I confess to a lot of head-scratching when I work on paintings like this. There’s a bit of deciphering that has to come first, and I find myself caught between what my photographs show and what I remember. The bluish shadow pattern of vague leaf shapes, most evident in the center and lower right quadrant, is an example of some artistic license. I used blue not because the shadows were factually blue, but because I needed the color to balance the green and coral of the overhanging boughs.

Interestingly, the painting evokes the feeling of lying on one’s back and looking at clouds through trees, even though the painting is looking down into the pond’s surface. I love the duality, and the poetry of such moments. Details below. Enjoy!

TM8563 Shadows and Reflections - detail from right side with reflected leaves, stems, and branshes under a scrim  of pollen and dust on the pond's surface

TM8563 Shadows and Reflections – detail from right side with reflected leaves, stems, and branshes under a scrim of pollen and dust on the pond’s surface

Technical painting notes: There were no shortcuts with this painting. I had to paint fairly realistic reflected trees and leaves first, then obscure them under the dust and pollen (mostly using spatter technique). Once the “pollen” was in place, I went back and strengthened some leaves, focused light on branches, and took the liberty of adding some bright orange and coral stem lines for drama. With this done, I used gray-blue glaze to paint in the shadows on top of the pollen. The last step was re-spattering dust (and light) wherever the composition needed integration.

TM8563 Shadows and Reflections - detail from below center

TM8563 Shadows and Reflections – detail from below center

TM8563 Shadows and reflections - detail from left side with reflected leaves and branches under a pollen dusted-surface

TM8563 Shadows and reflections – detail from left side with reflected leaves and branches under a pollen dusted-surface

Island Time

TM7246 Poem from Pebble Beach 36x36 oil on panel

TM7246 Poem from Pebble Beach 36×36 oil on panel

I’m pleased to announce a new show at the Bristol Art Museum in Bristol, Rhode Island, titled Island Time, opening July 24 and running through September 6, 2015. The group show will include thirteen of my paintings (stonescapes, pondscapes, a unique wave painting) and the work of Michael Gallard, Peter Gish, Karen Iglehart, Susan Schultz, and Betsy Zimmerman. The opening reception will be July 24, from 7-9pm. More information at: http://bristolartmuseum.org

Arboreal Reflections #5

TM8562 Arboreal Reflections #5 36x44 oil on panel

TM8562 Arboreal Reflections #5 36×44 oil on panel

Arboreal Reflections #5 is a continuation of the Arboreal Reflections series. The paintings are based on observing the reflections of dense woodland as it merges into the swamp and pond at Hamlen Woods. Each painting in the series delves deeper into the reflections, and into the grasses growing in the shallows. All of the paintings negotiate the intersection of memory with fact, but I’ve increasingly tried to preserve the abstract textures and accidents of the underpainting, to keep the sense of surprise this imparts to the final painting. Arboreal Reflections #5 is full of these surprises, especially when you look closely at the details  below. My goal is to present the feel of a pond in the wood with all its complexity. I hope you can smell the pine needles. Enjoy.

Technical painting notes:

TM8562 Arboreal Reflections #5 - detail from top edge with reflected trees and floating duckweed

TM8562 Arboreal Reflections #5 – detail from top edge with reflected trees and floating duckweed

The painting employs a range of greens, with a variety of cool and warm tones from the red side of the palette to create a harmonious contrast. I used burnt sienna, red oxide, and dioxazine violet for the reds; gold ochre, indian yellow, zinc yellow and raw sienna for my yellows.

TM8562 Arboreal Reflections #5 - detail from lower right with reflections, grasses, and floating duckweed. The layers of spatter, sometimes on the dry surface, other times into a wet glaze, created a sutle, almost dusty effect on the surface of my pond

TM8562 Arboreal Reflections #5 – detail from lower right with reflections, grasses, and floating duckweed.

The layers of spatter, sometimes on the dry surface, sometimes into a wet glaze, created a subtle, almost dusty effect on the surface of my pond.

TM8562 Arboreal Reflections #5 - detail from upper left with layeres and overlapping branches, reflections

TM8562 Arboreal Reflections #5 – detail from upper left with layeres and overlapping branches, reflections

I considered a blue sky, but decided an overcast gray would best set off the greens by introducing more neutral tones into the painting. The indian yellow, which is more strident, added a sunny note.

TM8562 Arboreal Reflections #5 - detail from lower left with sky and tree reflections. I layered the spatters, sometimes blotting the mineral spirits, at other times mixing color into  Liquin and mineral spirits for  colored spatters

TM8562 Arboreal Reflections #5 – detail from lower left with sky and tree reflections.

I layered the spatters, sometimes blotting the mineral spirits, at other times mixing color and Liquin with mineral spirits for colored dots.

 

Flutter Patterns

TM8561 Flutter Patterns 36x48 oil on panel

TM8561 Flutter Patterns 36×48 oil on panel

Each painting informs the next, so I bring you Flutter Patterns, another collaboration with Brian Eno. Flutter Patterns is based in part on photographs I took late last summer of leaves reflected in a quarry pond, fluttering in a breeze. It is also inspired and interpretive of a musical collaboration between Brian Eno and Harold Budd titled “Ambient 2 Plateaux of Mirror.” The music, composed for piano, has an ethereal fluttery sound, repetitive but always changing.  With fluttering leaves it is a perfect fit. The music has a bit more drama than “Neroli”, a related composition by Brian Eno alone, so I brought in more contrast and color. Details from the painting are below, with technical painting notes at the end. Enjoy.

TM8561 Flutter Ptterns - detail from center of right edge showing light on the water's surface, leaf and stem reflections, floating duckweed

TM8561 Flutter Ptterns – detail from center of right edge showing light on the water’s surface, leaf and stem reflections, floating duckweed

TM8561 Flutter Ptterns - detail from right side with mirrored leaves and duckweed on the water's surface

TM8561 Flutter Ptterns – detail from right side with mirrored leaves and duckweed on the water’s surface

TM8561 Flutter Ptterns - detail from center showing interwoven positive and negative shapes,  use of spatter to mute tones and control space

TM8561 Flutter Ptterns – detail from center showing interwoven positive and negative shapes, use of spatter to mute tones and control space

TM8561 Flutter Ptterns - detail from center of bottom edge

TM8561 Flutter Ptterns – detail from center of bottom edge

TM8561 Flutter Patterns - detail from center with reflected leaves and stems

TM8561 Flutter Patterns – detail from center with reflected leaves and stems

Technical painting notes: The painting began with a reddish brown oil color rolled loosely onto the primed panel. While wet, the paint was smeared with a plastic bag, then spritzed with solvent and blotted or re-rolled. This base layer created some interesting textures and tones. I let it dry. Glazes followed, into which I started to paint the leaves. I tried to vary the edges – hard v. soft. Some of the stem patterns were developed, and I decided to emphasize the diagonals of the leaves and contrast them with the suggested grid of stems and branches.  The negative sky shapes poking through were developed after the leaves had dried. Successive layers of variously colored spatter came next, both to unify the composition and to suggest dappled light (the size of the dot of spatter can be controlled by the size of the brush and the viscosity of the paint being used – I add Liquin to the mixed color and a touch of mineral spirits, then choose from a selection of very used, nylon watercolor brushes – a bigger splotch can be achieved with a natural bristle chip brush).

Remembering the reflections in the quarry, I wanted to imply layers – leaves overhanging the water as well as those of the slightly higher canopy. But I wanted the movement to dominate, the feel of flutter and repetition, of things appearing and disappearing before my eyes, the sense of lost and found echoes, much like in the music of “Plateaux of Mirror”.