Poem in Green and Gold

TM8519 Poem in Green and Gold 36x44 oil on panel

TM8519 Poem in Green and Gold 36×44 oil on panel

Poem in Green and Gold speaks to the transitional times of the year – between spring and summer, or summer and fall, when there are beautiful tonal shifts. The colors themselves can be hard to identify, but that only adds to the sense of mystery. The slightly out-of-focus effects of pollen drifting on the surface of the pond  also calls into question just what are we seeing. Is this what the start of a blink looks like? The suggestion of reflected blue sky and passing clouds, seen between the reflections of trees and under the pollen, pine needles, and a few lazily drifting leaves, anticipates a lovely day. Enjoy.

Technical painting notes:

TM8519 Poem in Green and GOld -detail from upper left of center

TM8519 Poem in Green and Gold -detail from upper left of center

The close-up detail from near the top of the painting shows the use of soft edges and a slight, semi-transparent gray glaze to suggest the pollen.

TM8519 Poem in Green and Gold - detail from middle left with tree reflections, scrim of floating pollen, pine needles

TM8519 Poem in Green and Gold – detail from middle left with tree reflections, scrim of floating pollen, pine needles

Floating pine needles, layered with a bit of duckweed and pollen, creates a now-you-see-it-now-you-don’t effect. The  layered spattering (first layer and next-to-last) adds depth and also serves to suggest layers of life on and in the pond.

TM8519 Poem in Green and GOld - detail from right center with sky and tree reflections

TM8519 Poem in Green and Gold – detail from right center with sky and tree reflections

The blue sky was intensified near the bottom to suggest the clearing weather and to contrast with the rust-colored pine needles.

TM8519 Poem in Green and Gold - detail showing layered development of painting

TM8519 Poem in Green and Gold – detail showing layered development of painting

A close-up detail shows spattering and the streaked application of glaze in the first layer, followed by more glazes and, scraping away of branch reflections, and the infilling of some of the scraped marks.

 

 

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