First Lily

TM8554 Frist Lily 35x54 oil on panel

TM8554 Frist Lily 36×54 oil on panel

I’ve been watching the lily pads rise, grow bigger, then seem to stall, their overlapping shapes a taunt, as if saying not yet, not yet, but my anticipation is so strong it brought forth this painted lily. The opening flower, slightly reflected in its watery world, seems so calm. Of course it doesn’t know it’s the first . Maybe it’s aware of the drifting leaves around it. Maybe its underwater stem feels the fish swimming past, the drizzle in the air. I think so. Details below. Enjoy.

TM8554 First Lily - detail with opening flower

TM8554 First Lily – detail with opening flower

TM8554 First Lily - detail from left side with tree and sky reflections, floating leaves, and duckweed

TM8554 First Lily – detail from left side with tree and sky reflections, floating leaves, and duckweed

TM8554 First Lily - detail from lower right

TM8554 First Lily – detail from lower right

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4 thoughts on “First Lily

  1. I am fascinated by your amazing paintings, Teri. Your color is beautiful and the moods ethereal. My husband and I are planning a trip to the Northeast in July and a highlight will be to visit the Harrison Gallery in Williamstown, MA to see your work in person. I love seeing your posts about your latest painting and appreciate all the details you share. I have been curious about the type panels you use and if they are prepared with an acrylic gesso or an oil primer? Would you mind sharing this information? In the meantime, I’ll keep watching for more posts of your amazing work.
    –Rose

    • Thank you for your kind comments. I’m sure you will enjoy visiting the gallery – I know I do!

      Regarding my panels, I use hollow core door slabs with a birch ply finish. The most recent panels are cut down to size and the ends in-filled. Lately, I’ve been purchasing the slabs from Maki Corporation in Gardner, Massachusetts. They do a good job of cutting them down. The doors are made by Masonite.

      After I dust and inspect them, I sand the edges a bit to prevent slivers, then give them 4-5 coats of alkyd primer. A quick sanding is next, followed by one or two more coats of primer and additional sanding. Tha panel backs are primed with one coat, or sometimes I use a coat of shellac. The sides are painted a neutral color that matches the palette of the painting. I like the wood surface because the details seem more crisp, and because it takes well to the monoprint techniques I use at the start of the painting. THe smooth surface also meand I can use watercolor brushes, and “slide” the paint around.

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