Red Autumn

TM8883 Red Autumn 36x54 oil on panel

TM8883 Red Autumn 36×54 oil on panel

Each stage of autumn has its own rewards. The late reds and russets when the oaks change color is probably my favorite time. I know I said earlier “I need yellow,” but that was temporary. Coral, burgundy, scarlet, terracotta, sienna, and a touch of fuchsia – all set against a pale blue sky – now  that’s what really makes my heart leap. Red Autumn is that feast of color reflected in my pond’s surface, but the mood, for all the intense color, is still quietly contemplative. The water is moving slowly, the air is still. I invite you to stop everything and enjoy the glorious moment. It’s usually brief. One storm, one gust of wind –  all will be gone. Enjoy. Details below.

TM8883 Red Autumn - detail from lower left quadrant with reflections and floating leaves

TM8883 Red Autumn – detail from lower left quadrant with reflections and floating leaves

TM8883 Red Autumn - detail from upper right with reflections, floating leaves and diminishing duckweed

TM8883 Red Autumn – detail from upper right with reflections, floating leaves and diminishing duckweed

TM8883 Red Autumn - detail from below center with reflected red tree and floating leaves

TM8883 Red Autumn – detail from below center with reflected red tree and floating leaves

TM8883 Red Autumn - detail from upper left

TM8883 Red Autumn – detail from upper left

Technical painting notes: The painting is on an alkyd-primed panel. I used monoprint techniques for the base layer, applying dark-valued oil paint with a roller then wiping and spraying the surface with solvent, followed by a spattering of color and minimal scraping of paint. When the base layer was dry, I glazed the whole thing, then started working into the wet glaze with soft brushes and color to establish some of the highlights and forms. Additional drying, then I reglazed and worked up more details, followed by more glazing and a touch of spatter.

 

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4 thoughts on “Red Autumn

  1. Fantastic painting Teri. Beautiful colors and somehow despite the abstractness of it, the fact that we are looking at a water surface is unmistakable.

    • The short answer is no. I too have noticed that some of the details could stand alone, but except in the relly small oils, I like to offer the viewer a “big picture.”

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